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Jackie Stewart
Stewart
Born 11 June 1939 (age 72)
Milton, West Dunbartonshire
Nationality United Kingdom British
Formula One World Championship Career
Status Retired
Teams BRM

Matra

Tyrrell Racing

Races 101

( 99 starts)

Pole positions 17
Wins

27

Championships 3
Podiums

43

Fastest laps

15

Career Points

360

First Race 1965 South African Grand Prix
Last Race 1973 United States Grand Prix (did not start)
First Win 1965 Italian Grand Prix
Last Win 1973 German Grand Prix

Sir John Young 'Jackie' Stewart, OBE (born 11 June 1939) is a Scottish former racing driver. Nicknamed the 'Flying Scot', he competed in Formula One between 1965 and 1973, winning three World Drivers' Championships. He also competed in Can-Am.

He is well known in the United States as a color commentator (pundit) of racing television broadcasts, and as a spokesman for Ford, where his Scottish accent has made him a distinctive presence.

Between 1997 and 1999, in partnership with his son, Paul, he was team principal of the Stewart Grand Prix Formula One racing team. In 2009 he was ranked fifth of the fifty greatest Formula One drivers of all time by journalist Kevin Eason who wrote: "He has not only emerged as a great driver, but one of the greatest figures of motor racing."

Jackie Stewart
Full Name John Young "Jackie" Stewart
Date of Birth 11 June 1939

Milton, West Dunbartonshire

Nationality United Kingdom British
Occupation Team owner
Employer Stewart Grand Prix
Years Active 1997 - 1999

BiographyEdit

Pre-Formula OneEdit

In 1964 he drove in Formula Three for Tyrrell. His debut, in the wet at Snetterton on 15 March, was dominant, taking an astounding 25 second lead in just two laps before coasting home to a win on a 44 second cushion. Within days, he was offered a Formula One ride with Cooper, but declined, preferring to gain experience under Tyrrell; he failed to win just two races (one to clutch failure, one to a spin) in becoming F3 champion.

After running John Coombs' E-type and practising in a Ferrari at Le Mans, he took a trial in an F1 Lotus 33-Climax, in which he impressed Colin Chapman and Jim Clark. Stewart again refused a ride in F1, but went instead to the Lotus Formula Two team. In his F2 debut, he was second at the difficult Clermont-Ferrand circuit in a Lotus 32-Cosworth.

Formula OneEdit

BRMEdit

1964 - 1965

While he signed with BRM alongside Graham Hill in 1965, a contract which netted him £4,000, his first race in an F1 car was for Lotus, as stand-in for an injured Clark, at the Rand Grand Prix in December 1964; the Lotus broke in the first heat, but he won the second. On his F1 debut in South Africa, he scored his first Championship point, finishing sixth. His first major competition victory came in the BRDC International Trophy in the late spring, and before the end of the year he won his first World Championship race at Monza, fighting wheel-to-wheel with teammate Hill's P261. Stewart finished his rookie season with three seconds, a third, a fifth, and a sixth, and third place in the World Drivers' Championship. He also piloted Tyrrell's unsuccessful F2 Cooper T75-BRM, and ran the Rover Company's revolutionary turbine car at Le Mans.

1966 - 1967

1966monacogp-johnsurtees(ferrari312),jackiestewart(brm)

John Surtees followed by Jackie Stewart at the 1966 Monaco GP

In 1966, a crash triggered his fight for improved safety in racing. On lap one of the 1966 Belgian Grand Prix at Spa-Francorchamps, when sudden rain caused many crashes, he found himself trapped in his overturned BRM, getting soaked by leaking fuel, which can result in a fire. The marshals had no tools to help him, and it took his teammate Hill and Bob Bondurant, who had both also crashed nearby, to get him out. Since then, a main switch for electrics and a removable steering wheel have become standard. Also, noticing the long and slow transport to a hospital, he brought his own doctor to future races, while the BRM supplied a medical truck for the benefit of all. It was a poor year all around; the BRMs were notoriously unreliable, although Stewart did win the Monaco Grand Prix. Stewart had some success in other forms of racing during the year, winning the 1966 Tasman Series and the 1966 Rothmans 12 Hour International Sports Car Race.

BRM's fortunes did not improve in 1967, during which Stewart came no higher than second at Spa, though he won F2 events for Tyrrell at Karlskoga, Enna, Oulton Park, and Albi in a Matra M5S or M7S. He also placed 2nd driving a works-entered Ferrari driving with Chris Amon at the BOAC 6 Hours at Brands Hatch, the 10th round of World Sportscar Championship at the time.

Tyrrell RacingEdit

1968 - 1969

In Formula One, he switched to Tyrrell's Matra International team, where he drove a Matra MS10-Cosworth for the 1968 and 1969 seasons. Skill (and improving tyres from Dunlop) brought a win in heavy rain at Zandvoort. Another win in rain and fog at the Nürburgring, where he won by a margin of four minutes. He also won at Watkins Glen, but missed Jarama and Monaco due to an F2 injury at Jarama. His car failed at Mexico City, and so lost the
StewartJackie19690801MatraFord

Stewart in 1969 with the Matra-Cosworth at the Nürburgring.

driving title to Hill.

In 1969, Stewart had a number of races where he completely dominated the opposition, such as winning by over 2 laps at Montjuïc, a whole minute at Clemont-Ferrand and more than a lap at Silverstone. With additional wins at Kyalami, Zandvoort, and Monza, Stewart became world champion in 1969 in a Matra MS80-Cosworth. Until September 2005, when Fernando Alonso in a Renault became champion, he was the only driver to have won the championship driving for a French marque and, as Alonso's Renault was built in the UK, Stewart remains the only driver to win the world championship in a French-built car.

1970 - 1971

For 1970, Matra (since taken over by Chrysler) insisted on using their own V12 engines, while Tyrrell and Stewart wanted to keep the Cosworths as well as the good connection to Ford. As a consequence, the Tyrrell team bought a chassis from March Engineering; Stewart took the March 701-Cosworth to wins at the Daily Mail Race of Champions and Jarama, but was soon overcome by Lotus' new 72. The new Tyrrell 001-Cosworth, appearing in August, suffered problems, but Stewart saw better days for it in 1971, and stayed on. Tyrrell continued to be sponsored by French fuel company Elf,
Tumblr li5xje7Dvd1qbb5xmo1 1280

Stewart at the 1971 USA Grand Prix

and Stewart raced in a car painted French Racing Blue for many years. Stewart also continued to race sporadically in Formula Two, winning at the Crystal Palace and placing at Thruxton. A projected Le Mans appearance, to co-drive the 4.5 litre Porsche 917K with Steve McQueen, did not come off, for McQueen's inability to get insurance. He also raced Can-Am, in the revolutionary Chaparral 2J. Stewart achieved pole position in 2 events, ahead of the dominant McLarens, but the chronic unreliability of the 2J prevented Stewart from finishing any races.

Stewart went on to win the Formula One world championship in 1971 using the excellent Tyrrell 003-Cosworth, winning Spain, Monaco, France, Britain, Germany, and Canada. He also did a full season in Can-Am, driving a Carl Haas sponsored Lola T260-Chevrolet. and again in 1973.

1972 - 1973

The stress of racing year round, and on several continents eventually caused medical problems for Stewart. During the 1972 Grand Prix season he missed Spa, due to gastritis, and had to cancel plans to drive a Can-Am McLaren, but won the Argentine, French, U.S., and Canadian Grands Prix, to come second to Emerson Fittipaldi in the drivers' standings. Stewart also competed in a Ford Capri RS2600 in the European Touring Car Championship, with F1 teammate François Cevert and other F1 pilots, at a time where the competition between Ford and BMW was at a height.

Entering the 1973 season, Stewart had decided to retire. He nevertheless won at South Africa, Belgium, Monaco, Holland, and Austria. His last (and then record-setting) 27th victory came at the Nürburgring with a convincing 1-2 for Tyrrell. "Nothing gave me more satisfaction than to win at the Nürburgring and yet, I was always afraid." Stewart later said. "When I left home for the German Grand Prix I always used to pause at the end of the driveway and take a long look back. I was never sure I'd come home again." After the fatal crash of his teammate François Cevert in practice for the 1973 United States Grand Prix at Watkins Glen, Stewart retired one race earlier than intended and missed what would have been his 100th GP.

Stewart held the record for most wins by a Formula One driver (27) for 14 years (broken by Alain Prost in 1987) and the record for most wins by a British Formula One driver for 19 years (broken by Nigel Mansell in 1992).

After Formula OneEdit

Subsequently he became a consultant for Ford Motor Company while continuing to be a spokesman for safer cars and circuits in Formula One. Later Stewart covered F1 races, NASCAR races and the Indianapolis 500 on American television during the 1970s and early 1980s, and has also worked on Australian and Canadian TV coverage. He was noted for his insightful analysis, Scottish accent, and rapid delivery, which once caused Jim McKay to remark that Stewart spoke almost as fast as he drove. Stewart is also the head sports consultant/ patron for the Royal Bank of Scotland. In March 2009, he waived his fee for the year in response to the bank losing £24bn in 2008.

Stewart Grand PrixEdit

In 1997 Stewart returned to Formula One, with Stewart Grand Prix, as a team owner in partnership with his son, Paul. As the works Ford team, their first race was the 1997
Stewart gp barrichello 1997

Rubens Barrichello driving for Stewart Grand Prix in 1997.

Australian Grand Prix. The only success of their first year came at the rain-affected Monaco Grand Prix where Rubens Barrichello finished an impressive second. Reliability was low however, with a likely 2nd place at the Nürburgring among several potential results lost. 1998 was even less competitive, with no podiums and few points.

However, after Ford acquired Cosworth in July 1998, they risked designing and building a brand-new engine for 1999. It paid off. The SF3 was consistently competitive throughout the season. The team won one race at the European Grand Prix at the Nürburgring with Johnny Herbert, albeit somewhat luckily, while Barrichello took three 3rd places, pole in France, and briefly led his home race at Interlagos. The team was later bought by Ford and became Jaguar Racing in 2000 (which became Red Bull Racing in 2005).

Complete Formula One resultsEdit

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position, races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 WDC Points
1965 Owen Racing Organisation BRM P261 BRM V8 RSA
6
MON
3
BEL
2
FRA
2
GBR
5
NED
2
GER
Ret
ITA
1
USA
Ret
MEX
Ret
3rd 33 (34)
1966 Owen Racing Organisation BRM P261 BRM V8 MON
1
BEL
Ret
FRA
GBR
Ret
NED
4
GER
5
7th 14
BRM P83 BRM H16 ITA
Ret
USA
Ret
MEX
Ret
1967 Owen Racing Organisation BRM P83 BRM H16 RSA
Ret
NED
Ret
BEL
2
GBR
Ret
ITA
Ret
USA
Ret
MEX
Ret
9th 10
BRM P261 BRM V8 MON
Ret
FRA
3
BRM P115 BRM H16 GER
Ret
CAN
Ret
1968 Matra International Matra MS9 Ford Cosworth DFV RSA
Ret
ESP
MON
2nd 36
Matra MS10 BEL
4
NED
1
FRA
3
GBR
6
GER
1
ITA
Ret
CAN
6
USA
1
MEX
7
1969 Matra International Matra MS10 Ford Cosworth DFV RSA
1
ESP
1
1st 63
Matra MS80 MON
Ret
NED
1
FRA
1
GBR
1
GER
2
ITA
1
CAN
Ret
USA
Ret
MEX
4
1970 Tyrrell Racing Organisation March 701 Ford Cosworth DFV RSA
3
ESP
1
MON
Ret
BEL
Ret
NED
2
FRA
9
GBR
Ret
GER
Ret
AUT
Ret
ITA
2
5th 25
Tyrrell 001 CAN
Ret
USA
Ret
MEX
Ret
1971 Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell 001 Ford Cosworth DFV RSA
2
1st 62
Tyrrell 003 ESP
1
MON
1
NED
11
FRA
1
GBR
1
GER
1
AUT
Ret
ITA
Ret
CAN
1
USA
5
1972 Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell 003 Ford Cosworth DFV ARG
1
RSA
Ret
ESP
Ret
FRA
1
GBR
2
GER
11
2nd 45
Tyrrell 004 MON
4
BEL
Tyrrell 005 AUT
7
ITA
Ret
CAN
1
USA
1
1973 Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell 005 Ford Cosworth DFV ARG
3
BRA
2
1st 71
Tyrrell 006 RSA
1
ESP
Ret
BEL
1
MON
1
SWE
5
FRA
4
GBR
10
NED
1
GER
1
AUT
2
ITA
4
CAN
5
USA
DNS
  • Winner of the BRDC International Trophy in 1965 and 1973.

ReferencesEdit

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackie_Stewart
  2. http://www.statsf1.com/en/jackie-stewart.aspx
  3. http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/drv-stejac.html
  4. http://www.grandprixhistory.org/stew_bio.htm

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